Fruit Nursery

  • Fruit plants are available at River Berry Farm during our farm stand season, Mother’s Day through Halloween, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  (Not available for purchase on-line.)
  • The farm stand is self-serve from July 4th to Halloween, so if you would like support in picking out your plants during this period, please email us a week or so ahead, to set up an appointment: riverberryfarm@gmail.com.
  • Though we will try to keep this list updated, some items may be sold out upon your arrival.  Sorry, no reservations; it’s first come, first serve.
  • DELIVERY SERVICE:  We offer delivery of the larger fruit trees for $25 per site/delivery, to addresses in the following towns:  Fairfax, St. Albans, Fairfield, Fletcher, Bakersfield, Cambridge, Underhill, Jericho, Westford, Colchester, Essex, Milton and Georgia.  Deliveries will be on the following Wednesday, only.  You do not need to be there.  We will unload the trees onto your driveway.  Delivery payment is due at point of tree purchase.

APPLE TREES                                               $74.99

Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination; the varieties offered here can serve as pollinators for each other.  All of our apple varieties are grown on semi-dwarf rootstock, are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Apple trees should be pruned in March, after the coldest weather has passed and before new growth begins, to increase production.   The following link provides a great illustration in the “pruning guide”, as well as lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow apples.

Here’s a link to Growing Apples from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

Honeycrisp Apple:   

Fruit Color and Taste: Red with some yellow skin, very crisp and juicy flesh, well-balanced honey sweet with tartness. 
Use:  Excellent fresh and stores up to six months.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 7  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April.
Fruit Time:  Late September – Early October.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained
Height:  12′ – 16′  (grown on M.7, semi-dwarf rootsock).
Spacing:  15′.

Notes:  Honeycrisp is a great apple for eating fresh from the the tree, offering excellent flavor and juiciness.  Great home gardener apple tree offering good disease-resistance.  Must have another apple variety nearby that flowers the same time to get fruit; Freedom and/or Liberty are good cross-pollinators. 

 

Liberty Apple:  

Fruit Color and Taste:  Deep red skin, crisp yellow-white, sharp yet sweet tasting, juicy flesh.  
Use:  Fresh eating and applesauce, baking, stores well until January.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 7,   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April.
Fruit Time:  Mid-late September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  12′ – 16′  (grown on M.7, semi-dwarf rootsock).
Spacing:  15′.

Notes:  Liberty is a prolific and highly disease-resistant apple variety.  REALLY, the BEST variety for the home gardener!!    Must have another apple variety nearby that flowers the same time to get fruit;  Freedom and/or Honeycrisp are good cross-pollinators. 

 

PEAR TREES                                                              $74.99


Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination; the varieties offered here can serve as pollinators for each other.  All of our pear varieties are grown on standard rootstock and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Pear trees should be pruned in March, after the coldest weather has passed and before new growth begins to increase production.   The following link provides a great illustration in the “pruning guide”, as well as lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow pears.

Here’s a link to Growing Pears from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summercrisp Pear:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Light green (turning yellowish) with a red blush, harvest while still crisp green with blush.  Sweet and crisp flesh, excellent eating.
Use:  Excellent fresh and can store up to two months, but not great for canning.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8,   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Early May.
Fruit Time:  Mid August.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils: Well-drained.
Height:  25‘ at maturity.
Spacing: 20′.

Notes:  Summercrisp is an excellent tasting pear with good fire blight resistance.  A second pear variety flowering at the same time is needed for cross pollination, which is why we offer Patten, though it is prone to fire blight.

 

 

 

 

Flemish Beauty Pear:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, roundish, yellow, sweet.
Use: Fresh easting.
Hardiness Zone:  3 -8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Early May.
Fruit Time:  Mid September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils: Well-drained.
Height:  10′-12′ at maturity.
Spacing: 8′.

Notes:  Flemish Beauty is an old-fashioned European eating pear with rich sweet flavor and great for cold climates like ours!

PLUM TREES                                                             $74.99


Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination; the varieties offered here can serve as pollinators for each other.  All of our plum varieties are grown on standard rootstock, are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Plum trees should be pruned in March, after the coldest weather has passed and before new growth begins to increase production.   The following link provides a great illustration in the “pruning guide”, as well as lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow plums.

Here’s a link to Growing Stone Fruit (including plums) from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pembina Plum:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Red with bluish tint, somewhat thick and acid skin, round fruit with yellow flesh. mid to large size, offering sweet, juicy flesh.  Freestone, meaning the stone is more easily removed, which is helpful in cooking and canning.
Use:  Fresh, cooking and canning, does not keep long fresh, eat up!
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 8,  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April-May.
Fruit Time:  Mid-August to early September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height: 10′ – 15′.
Spacing: 15′.

Notes:  Pembina is a super hardy plum with great tasting fruit, which tend to yield heaviest in alternating years.  Cross pollination is needed for fruiting.  Toka is a great pollination partner for Pembina.

 

 

Toka (“Bubblegum”) Plum:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Medium to large, reddish bronze skin with yellowish, very rich, sweet, “bubblegum-scented” flesh.  Clingstone, meaning it is hard to clear the stone from the flesh, so best for fresh eating.
Use:  Fresh.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8,  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April-May.
Fruit Time:  August.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height: 20′ – 25′ at maturity.
Spacing:  15′.

Notes:  Toka is an excellent pollinator plum, growing into a vase shaped tree with a dense canopy and is a heavy producer.

 

 

 

 

SOUR CHERRY TREES                                        $74.99


Sour cherries are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit trees, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.  All of our sour cherry varieties are grown on standard rootstock, are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Cherry trees should be pruned in March, after the coldest weather has passed and before new growth begins to increase production.   The following link provides a great illustration in the “pruning guide”, as well as lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow cherries.

Here’s a link to Growing Stone Fruit (including cherries) from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meteor Sour Cherry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Red, large and shiny.
Use:  Bake, juice, sauce, preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 8    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Early May.
Fruit Time:  Late June.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  10′ – 12′ at maturity.
Spacing:   18′

Notes:  Though northern Vermont is too cold for sweet cherries, we can grow the next best thing, the sour cherry.  Meteor is a super hardy, old-fashioned sour cherry that can produce without having a pollination partner.

 

PEACH TREES                                                             $74.99

 

Peaches are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit trees, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination   All of our peach varieties are grown on semi-dwarf rootstock and are disease resistant.   Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Peach trees should be pruned in March, after the coldest weather has passed and before new growth begins to increase production.   The following link provides a great illustration in the “pruning guide”, as well as lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow peaches.

Here’s a link to Growing Stone Fruit (including plums) from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intrepid Peach:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, firm, red skin, yellow fruit.
Use:  Fresh and canning
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 8    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Late Spring.
Fruit Time:  Late August.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  15′ at maturity.
Spacing:   12′

Notes:  Peaches in northern VT??  Semi-dwarf Intrepid Peach is outstanding for hardiness, so just sneaks into hardiness for us at Zone 4.  It has outstanding flavor, texture and is fresstone so it’s also great for canning.

 

Challenger Peach:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, firm, red skin, yellow fruit.
Use:  Fresh and canning
Hardiness Zone:  5- 9 (needs warm microclimate!!)  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Late Spring.
Fruit Time:  Mid August.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  9′ at maturity.
Spacing:   12′

Notes:  Peaches in northern VT??  Semi-dwarf Challenger Peach is definitely pushing our limits at Zone 5, while most of us in Franklin County would be Zone 4, so plant this in a warm microclimate free from cold winter winds and out of early frost pockets.   Challenger Peach offers great flavor and good disease resistance, so worth a try, if you’ve got a good warm microclimate.

BLUEBERRY PLANTS                                              $32.99


Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination.  All of our blueberry varieties are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained, acidic soils and full sun, but can handle partial sun.  Blueberries should be pruned every winter to remove dead and weak wood.  The following link provides a great description on how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow blueberries.

Here’s a link to Growing Blueberries from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bluecrop Blueberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, light blue with classic blueberry flavor, mild sweet with some tartness.
Use:  Fresh, baking, freezing and preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 7    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May.
Fruit Time:  Early August.
Light:  Full Sun, can handle part sun, but best production in full.
Soils:  Well-drained and acidic.
Height:  3′ – 5′.
Spacing:  Can plant as close as 2.5′ for a hedge or up to 6′ if want to want to grow them more individually.  Rows should be 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Bluecrop is a popular commercial cultivar due to it’s high-yielding and good flavor, sure to please.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blueray Blueberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, dark blue, mild-sweet, great quality flavor.
Use:  Fresh, baking, freezing and preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 7   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May.
Fruit Time:  Early August.
Light:  Full Sun, can handle part sun, but best production in full.
Soils:  Well-drained and acidic.
Height:  4′ – 6′.
Spacing:  Can plant as close as 2.5′ for a hedge or up to 6′ if want to want to grow them more individually.  Rows should be 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Blueray is an excellent mid-season, productive, somewhat open-branching blueberry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patriot Blueberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:   Good blue with large, tart, great-eating berries.
Use:  Fresh, baking, freezing and preserves.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 7    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May  (earlier culitvar).
Fruit Time:  Late July.
Light:  Full Sun, can handle part sun, but best production in full.
Soils:  Well-drained, though Patriot is considered more tolerant of heavier soils than most blueberries, acidic.
Height:  3′ – 5′.
Spacing:  Can plant as close as 2.5′ for a hedge or up to 6′ if want to want to grow them more individually.  Rows should be 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Patriot is the earliest producing blueberry, offering large, great flavored berries.

 

 

 Northland Blueberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark blue, medium size, mild, but flavorful.
Use:  Fresh, baking, freezing and preserves.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 7    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May.
Fruit Time:  Early August.
Light:  Full Sun, can handle part sun, but best production in full.
Soils:  Well-drained and acidic.
Height:  4′ – 7′, tallest cultivar we sell.
Spacing:  Can plant as close as 2.5′ for a hedge or up to 6′ if want to want to grow them more individually.  Rows should be 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Northland is the tallest and most winter-hardy of the blueberries we offer.  

HONEYBERRY (HASKAP) PLANTS                  $32.99

 

Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination.  Honeyberries are a tangy, tart/sweet small blue fruit, larger but not as sweet as a blueberry, full of antioxidants.  Some say they’re an acquired tastes, while others just love them.  All of our honeyberry varieties are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained, acidic soils and full sun, but can handle partial sun, if not full shade.  Honeyberries should be pruned every 2 -3 years to remove dead and wood.  The following link provides a great description on how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow honeyberries.

Here’s a link to Growing Honeyberries (Haskaps) from the University of Saskatchewan.

 

Berry Blue (Czech 17) Honeyberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark blue, cylindrical fruit with a crisp sweet/tart flavor.
Use:  Desserts, juice, preserves.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time: April.
Fruit Time:  June.
Light:  Full sun to part shade, possibly full shade, but less productive.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  5”-7′.
Spacing:  4′ – 5′

Notes:  Berry Blue, also known as Czech 17, Honeyberry is an older, tried and true variety, that is not as sweet as some of the newer varieties, but, really none of the honeyberries are very sweet and are great in desserts and preserves where sugar is added.  Berry Blue has great production.

 

Cinderella Honeyberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark blue, large, cylindrical fruit, sweet with a tang.
Use:  Fresh, desserts, juice, preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 8   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April.
Fruit Time:  June.
Light:  Full sun to part shade, possibly full shade, but less productive.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height: 2′ – 3′
Spacing:  3′ – 4′
Notes:  Like Berry Blue, Cinderella is an older variety that is not as sweet as some of the newer varieties but is very productive.  Honeyberries are more tart than blueberries but can be eaten fresh, with a pucker, and are an excellent source of antioxidants and Vitamin C.

 

RASPBERRY PLANTS                                            $21.99


Raspberries are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit plants, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.   Our raspberries are hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun, but can handle partial sun. 

Raspberries are biennial, meaning each cane lives for two (2) years and the root system will produce new canes.  There are two (2) different growing types of raspberries: summer-bearing and fall-bearing;  see descriptions below.

Here’s a link to Growing Raspberries from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trellis to support your raspberries helps provide support and ease of picking.  Place uprights every 15′ – 20′ and wire or twine horizontal support at 3′ above ground and about 2′ apart.  Image from the University of Maryland Extension.  You may want another support line of wire or twine a foot lower to keep growing canes in line.

SUMMER-BEARING RASPBERRIES

Summer-bearing raspberries require a little more care in pruning than fall-bearing.  They produce berries on the two year old canes which ten die and should be pruned just after harvest season.  Cut to the ground any canes (branches) that have produced fruit and thin the remaining branches to 4 or 5 canes.  Click on the University of Minnesota link above for a description on how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow raspberries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nova Raspberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Bright red, medium to large fruit that is sweet and slightly tart with good rich flavor.
Use:  Fresh, freezing, jams, baking, good keeping – relative to most raspberries which really need to be eaten or dealt with on day of picking.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May.
Fruit Time: July – August.  Nice extended ripening period.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height: 5′ – 6′
Spacing:  2.5′ apart and rows 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Nova is a very hardy, dependable, large producing raspberry with good rich flavor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prelude Raspberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Red, medium to large size with great flavor.
Use:  Fresh, freezing, jams, baking.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 8    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Early May.
Fruit Time:  July – early August.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:   4′ – 6′ 
Spacing:  2.5′ apart and rows 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Prelude is one of the earliest ripening raspberries, very hardy and vigorous.

 

 

FALL-BEARING RASPBERRY

Fall-bearing raspberry are easier to prune than summer-bearing.  They produce fruit on the canes that emerge that spring.  In early April, mow or cut all the canes (branches) right to the base.  Click on the University of Minnesota link at the start of the raspberry section, for a description on how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow raspberries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anne:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Yellow, large, very sweet, excellent fruit.
Use:  Fresh, freezing, jams, baking.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 9    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  July – August.
Fruit Time:  Late August – frost
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  4′ – 6′.
Spacing:  2.5′ apart and rows 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Anne Raspberry is one of the sweetest fall-baring raspberries available, surprising some with their yellow color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Himbo Top Raspberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Bright red, extremely large, good flavor.
Use:  Not as firm as some, so best for fresh eating.  Can use for baking, jams and freezing if processing within the day.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  Early-July  – August.
Fruit Time:  Early September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  5′ – 7′
Spacing:  2.5′ apart and rows 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Himbo Top is a very productive, vigorous and disease-resistant fall-bearing raspberry producing extremely large, good flavored fruit.

 

 

Joan J Raspberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Deep red, large and everything you want in that raspberry flavor.
Use:  Fresh, freezing, jams, baking.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  July – August.
Fruit Time:  Late-August – frost.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  4′ – 6′.
Spacing:  2.5′ apart and rows 8′ – 10′ apart.

Notes:  Joan J is a high-yielding, thornless, early-fall-bearing raspberry producing good flavored, easy to pick, long-lasting (for a raspberry) berries.

 

ELDERBERRY PLANTS                                         $21.99

 

Must have two varieties flowering at similar times for pollination, though the variety, Marge, which is cross between an American and European elderberry, can be self-fruitful. Elderberry fruit is rather tart and unpalatable to some when eaten fresh, and please don’t as seeds are toxic as is the flesh when not ripe.   BUT, elderberries are incredibly rich in antioxidants and most everyone could enjoy syrups and preserves with the added spice, honey and/or sugar.  We can attest to the amazing flu-sympton reduction benefits of elderberry syrup.  Beware:  much of the elderberry plant is toxic to humans, even the seeds, if eaten raw. 

All of our elderberry varieties are disease resistant and hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained, acidic soils and full sun, but can handle partial sun. Elderberry are fast growing and prone to suckering.  The following link provides a great description on how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow elderberries.

Here’s a link to Growing Elderberries from University of New Hampshire Extension.

And here’s a link to an easy Elderberry Syrup Recipe from Allrecipe.  (Do be sure to strain).

 

Bob Gordon Elderberry

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark purple black, tart/sweet, considered sweeter and larger than most other Elderberry cultivars.
Use:  Syrups, preserve baking, wine.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 9   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time: June – July.
Fruit Time:  Late July – August.
Light:  Full Sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  6′ – 8′.
Spacing:  6′ – 8′.

Notes:  Bob Gordon is a high-yielding elderberry with drooping fruit which can help reduce the bird pressure (though it’s nice to share!).  Do not eat the berries raw as the seeds of all elderberries are toxic and can accumulate if ingesting larger amounts.

 

Marge Elderberry

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark purple black, tart/sweet, often considered the most productive and is self-fertile
Use:  Syrups, preserve baking, wine.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 10   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  June – July.
Fruit Time:  August – September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:   Well-drained.  
Height:  7′ – 10′ (taller than most elderberries, and a vigorous grower.)
Spacing:  6′ – 8′.

Notes:  Marge is a very productive with large fruit heads, self-fruitful, meaning it does not need a pollinator partner though one can increase yield some.  So if, you only have room for one, go with Marge.  Do not eat the berries raw as the seeds of all elderberries are toxic and can accumulate if ingesting larger amounts.

 

 

 

 

Nova Elderberry

Fruit Color and Taste:  Dark purple black, tart/sweet.
Use:  Syrups, preserve baking, wine.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 8   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  June – July.
Fruit Time:  August – September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:   Well-drained.  
Height:  6′ – 7′
Spacing:  6′ – 8′.

Notes:  Nova Elderberry is considered self-fruitful but will produce more with a pollinator partner.  The plant is on the smaller size, for an elderberry and the plants are very productive.  Do not eat the berries raw as the seeds of all elderberries are toxic and can accumulate if ingesting larger amounts.

 

 

 

CURRANT PLANTS                                                   $21.99


Currants are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit plants, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.   Our currants are hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full to partial sun.  Prune currents in late winter to maintain an open canopy.  The following link provides a description of how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow currents.

Here’s a link to Growing Currants and Gooseberries from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

Red Lake Currants:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large, juicy, red, considered one of the best red currants, which run tart.
Use:  Great for preserves, baking, dry for your scones!!, can be eaten fresh but …it is a currant, so it runs tart, great for the birds too!.
Hardiness Zone:   3 – 7  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April – May
Fruit Time:  Late May – June.
Light:  Full to part sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  3′ – 5′
Spacing: 4′ – 6′, closer for a hedge.

Notes:  Red Lake is a tasty currant, great for processing and eating fresh, though tart.  Can be a nice ornamental hedge that feeds you and the wildlife.

 

 

 

 

Black Consort Currants:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Black, large, musky sweet-tart.
Use:  Great for preserves, baking,…it is a currant, so it runs tart, great for the birds too!.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April – May
Fruit Time:  April – May.
Light:  Full to part sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  3′ – 5′
Spacing: 6′.

Notes:  Black Consort Currant is an old and much loved variety producing clusters of sweet-tart musky flavored berries, very high in Vitamin C and offering great orange-red fall leaves.

GOOSEBERRY PLANTS                                         $21.99


Gooseberries are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit plants, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.   Our gooseberries are hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full to partial sun.  Prune  gooseberries in late winter to maintain an open canopy.  The following link provides a description of how to prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow gooseberries.

Here’s a link to Growing Currants and Gooseberries from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

 

 

 

 

Hinnomaki Red Gooseberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Large fruit with deep red, crisp tangy skin and sweet flesh.
Use:  Fresh, baking and preserves.
Hardiness Zone: 3 – 8    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May
Fruit Time: Late July – Early August
Light:  Can handle full sun, but fine with part sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  3′ – 5′
Spacing:  3′

Notes:  Hinnomaki Red is somewhat unique in its color, and maybe a little sweeter flesh taste.  Gooseberries are a unique flavor and so worth adding to your nursery.  You will get better production with annual pruning, in the winter, removing the oldest branches.  My experience is the somewhat thorny plants are not particularly attractive in the fall and winter, so maybe not front and center, where you want a nice view.

 

 

 

Pixwell Gooseberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Medium size, maintain green, then take on a slight pinkish tint when fully ripe.
Use:  Fresh, baking and preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 6    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May – June.
Fruit Time:  Late July – Early August
Light: Full sun to part sun.
Soils:  Well-drained.
Height:  3′ – 4′.
Spacing:  3′

Notes:  Pixwell is an old and trusted variety, with good flavor and production.  Gooseberries are a unique flavor and so worth adding to your nursery.  You will get better production with annual pruning, in the winter, removing the oldest branches.  My experience is the somewhat thorny plants are not particularly attractive in the fall and winter, so maybe not front and center, where you want a nice view.

GRAPE PLANTS                                                         $21.99

These grape varieties are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit plants, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.   Our grapes are hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full sun.  Grapes are great for growing on a fence, trellis or arbor and need to be pruned to increase production.  Beware, grapes are vigorous; you will have a huge tangle if you do not prune aggressively each year.  

Click on the link below for tips on how to train and prune along with lots of great, easy to follow suggestions on how to grow grapes.

Here’s a link to Growing Grapes from the University of Minnesota Extension.

Here’s an image of a simple grape trellis, but really, you can train your grapes onto most anything you can attach the vine to.  Grape plants can live a long time, so need a durable trellis:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image from Whizbangtrellis.blogspot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bluebell Grape:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Excellent, large, old-time, dark blue/purple grape, resembles Concord grape but is much hardier for our cold northern VT climate.  Bluebell grape has seeds.
Use:  Fresh, preserves, juice.
Hardiness Zone:  3 – 8     USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April-May.
Fruit Time:  September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained, acidic.
Height:  8′ – 10′.
Spacing:  6′ – 8′, rows 6′ – 9′ apart.

Notes:  Bluebell is a great, hardy, Concord-like, sweet grape, well-suited for growing in Vermont.  Select a durable structure and enjoys years and years of grapes.  Do follow the pruning recommendations for best quality and yield.

 

 

Somerset Seedless Grape:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Red/pink, small berries with wonderful sweet grape flavor.
Use:   Fresh, preserves, juice.
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8, Somerset is the hardiest seedless variety.    USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  April – May
Fruit Time:  September.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained, acidic.
Height:  4′ – 6′.
Spacing:  6′ – 8′, rows 6′ – 9′ apart.

Notes:  Somerset is a great, red, medium size, seedless grape, the most well-suited seedless grape for growing in Vermont.  Select a durable structure and enjoys years and years of grapes.  Do follow the pruning recommendations for best quality and yield.

STRAWBERRY PLANTS:   

Strawberries are self-fruitful, so unlike most fruit plants, you do not need two different varieties for cross-pollination.   Our strawberries are hardy for our growing zone.  Best fruit production in well-drained soils and full to partial sun.  Day-neutral strawberries are great for all season production of small amounts while June-bearing strawberries are great for large production over a couple of weeks.

Though strawberries are perennial, meaning they will continue to grow for years, we find the best production is on the second year’s growth, so a good idea is to have three parallel beds:  one for planting this year, one for what you planted last year and will be picking from this year, and one fallow for planting next year.   Mow the plants to 2″-3″ in August and mulch heavily with straw in late November.  Click on the link below for lots of helpful, easy to follow guidelines on how to grow strawberries.

Here’s a link to Growing Strawberries from the University of Minnesota Extension.

 

DAY-NEUTRAL                                          $2.49/4″pot  and  $9.99/gal.  

Day-neutral strawberries produce a moderate amount throughout the summer and become more productive in the fall;  great for a snack, but probably not so great for the quantities you would want for jam or freezing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seascape Strawberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Red, productive, large, juicy and considered, by many, to be the best flavored ever-bearing.
Use:  Fresh (can freeze, bake, preserve too, but likely not the quantity you’d want at one time).
Hardiness Zone:   4 – 8  USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May – August
Fruit Time:   A little at a time from late June – early fall.
Light:  Full sun.
Soils:  Well-drained (or in raised bed).
Height:  6″
Spacing:  12″ – 18″ in the row, 4′ between rows.

Notes:  Seascape strawberry is what we plant in our strawberry hanging baskets, which produce a few berries at a time throughout the summer and early fall.  The fruit is large, sweet and juicy and always a treat.  

JUNE-BEARING                      $19.49/12 (bare root)

These are the kind we sell as pick-your-own on the farm; they produce large volumes in late June through early July, then are done for the year.

Jewel Strawberry:

Fruit Color and Taste:  Jewels are one of our most favorite, large
Use:  Fresh, freezing, baking, preserves.
Hardiness Zone:  4 – 8   USDA Zone Map.
Flower Time:  May – June
Fruit Time:  Intense fruiting for about weeks in late June – early July.
Light:   Full sun.
Soils:  Well drained.
Height:  6″
Spacing:  12″ – 18″ in the row, 4′ between rows.

Notes:  Jewel strawberry is one of most favorite varieties we grow for pick-your-own.  They are reliably productive with great juicy, sweet flavor.